Category: Linux Commands

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20 Netstat Commands for Linux Network Management

netstat (network statistics) is a command-line tool for monitoring network connections both incoming and outgoing as well as viewing routing tables, interface statistics, etc. [ You might also like: 22 Linux Networking Commands for Sysadmin ] netstat is available on all Unix-like Operating Systems and also available on Windows OS as well. It is very

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20 Netstat Commands for Linux Network Management

netstat (network statistics) is a command-line tool for monitoring network connections both incoming and outgoing as well as viewing routing tables, interface statistics, etc. [ You might also like: 22 Linux Networking Commands for Sysadmin ] netstat is available on all Unix-like Operating Systems and also available on Windows OS as well. It is very

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20 Linux YUM (Yellowdog Updater, Modified) Commands for Package Management

In this article, we will learn how to install, update, remove, find packages, manage packages and repositories on Linux systems using YUM (Yellowdog Updater Modified) tool developed by RedHat. The example commands shown in this article are practically tested on our RHEL 8 server, you can use these materials for study purposes, RHEL certifications, or

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20 Linux YUM (Yellowdog Updater, Modified) Commands for Package Management

In this article, we will learn how to install, update, remove, find packages, manage packages and repositories on Linux systems using YUM (Yellowdog Updater Modified) tool developed by RedHat. The example commands shown in this article are practically tested on our RHEL 8 server, you can use these materials for study purposes, RHEL certifications, or

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8 Linux Nslookup Commands to Troubleshoot DNS (Domain Name Server)

nslookup is a command-line administrative tool for testing and troubleshooting DNS servers (Domain Name Server). It is used to query specific DNS resource records (RR) as well. Most operating systems come with a built-in nslookup feature. This article demonstrates the widely used nslookup command in detail. Nslookup can be run in two modes: Interactive and

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8 Linux Nslookup Commands to Troubleshoot DNS (Domain Name Server)

nslookup is a command-line administrative tool for testing and troubleshooting DNS servers (Domain Name Server). It is used to query specific DNS resource records (RR) as well. Most operating systems come with a built-in nslookup feature. This article demonstrates the widely used nslookup command in detail. Nslookup can be run in two modes: Interactive and

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10 Linux Dig (Domain Information Groper) Commands to Query DNS

In our previous article, we have explained nslookup command examples and usage, which is a networking command-line tool used for querying and getting information of DNS (Domain Name System). Here, in this article, we come up with another command line tool called dig, which is much similar to the Linux nslookup tool. We will see

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10 Linux Dig (Domain Information Groper) Commands to Query DNS

In our previous article, we have explained nslookup command examples and usage, which is a networking command-line tool used for querying and getting information of DNS (Domain Name System). Here, in this article, we come up with another command line tool called dig, which is much similar to the Linux nslookup tool. We will see

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10 lsof Command Examples in Linux

This is our ongoing series of Linux commands and in this article, we are going to review lsof command with practical examples. lsof meaning ‘LiSt Open Files’ is used to find out which files are open by which process. As we all know Linux/Unix considers everything as a file (pipes, sockets, directories, devices, etc). One

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10 lsof Command Examples in Linux

This is our ongoing series of Linux commands and in this article, we are going to review lsof command with practical examples. lsof meaning ‘LiSt Open Files’ is used to find out which files are open by which process. As we all know Linux/Unix considers everything as a file (pipes, sockets, directories, devices, etc). One